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Woven wheel icon
Woven wheel

  • Wheel stitch
  • Spider's web
  • Whipped circle
  • Woven spot
  • Woven spoke
  • Berry stitch

​Woven wheel stitch is constructed from a wheel of an odd number of spokes with the same or a different thread woven around them.  It produces a raised circle of thread which lends itself to portraying flowers. 

Woven wheels feature in Elizabethan embroidery, as demonstrated by various textiles in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.  The examples are typically stitched in metal thread, either silver or silver-gilt.

Woven wheel is generously sponsored by Ruth Levy

Method

You can use a different number of spokes, but it should always be an odd number.

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1

Bring your needle up at the edge of the circle, then take it down a little way around in a clockwise direction, still on the edge of the circle.

2

Bring the needle up at the centre of the circle and tighten the loop against it.

3

Take the needle down, as though finishing a fly stitch. Bring it up a little way clockwise around the circle (aim for the same distance as between the initial stitch’s spacing).

4

Take the needle directly across the centre, and down at the two o’clock position. Draw the thread through and bring it up a little way clockwise around the circle.

5

Take the needle across and down opposite, then make a small holding stitch in the centre of the spokes.

6

Bring the needle up slightly off-centre, between the spokes and close to the holding stitch.

7

Change to a tapestry needle and, working anticlockwise, slip the thread over the adjacent spoke and under the next one.

8

Continue working in this way, weaving the thread over then under alternate spokes. Work outwards from the wheel’s centre.

9

Continue working until the spokes are completely covered, then take the needle through to the back and secure the thread.

Woven wheel

Common uses

Identifying Woven wheel

A circular stitch with woven thread worked from centre outwards.

References