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Threaded back stitch icon
Threaded back stitch

  • Double threaded back stitch
Threaded back stitch main image

Threaded back stitch consists of a foundation of ordinary back stitch with either one or two additional threads woven back and forth under the back stitch.  If a single thread is threaded, the line has a wave effect; if two threads are used the line of back stitch has a scalloped effect on both sides.  Some authors call this latter version double threaded back stitch.

It is often used for outlining shapes or as a border; each component can be worked in a different thread or colour to create different effects.

Threaded back stitch is generously sponsored by Sharon Quick

Method

Use a tapestry needle for threading in order to avoid piercing the fabric and thread.

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1

Work a foundation row of back stitch.

2

Using a different thread, come up at the end of the back stitch. Slide the needle under the back stitch without piercing the fabric.

3

Starting from the same side of the back stitch line, slide the needle under the second back stitch.

4

Continue passing the thread back and forth under the back stitches.

5

Take down the needle at the end of the back stitch.

6

A second thread can be worked from the same starting point: slide the needle under the first back stitch in the opposite direction from the previous threaded line.

7

Now pass the needle under the second back stitch. The second threading fills in the spaces left on the first threading so that the stitch is symmetrical.

8

Work the second threading alternately back and forth.

9

Take the needle down at the end of the back stitch.

10

1st row: back stitch
2nd row: (single) threaded back stitch
3rd row: double threaded back stitch

Threaded back stitch

Structure of stitch

Embroidery Techniques

References

  • Mrs Archibald Christie, Samplers and Stitches (1921) , p.68
  • Mary Thomas, Mary Thomas’s Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches (1934) , p.54
  • Jennifer Campbell, Ann-Marie Bakewell, Guide to Embroidery Stitches (2004) , p.123
  • Betty Barnden, The Embroidery Stitch Bible (2003) , p.42