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Interlaced herringbone band icon
Interlaced herringbone band

  • Double herringbone interlaced
  • Interlaced herringbone stitch
  • Interlacing stitch
  • Armenian cross stitch
Interlaced herringbone band main image

Interlaced herringbone band is worked over a row of double herringbone stitch.  It is important to check the sequence of the crossed part of the double herringbone stitch is correct so that this intricate interlacing can be achieved.  The two ends of the foundation double herringbone stitch can be made shorter as shown on the left, and the size of the band can be varied, depending on your design.

For an insertion version of this stitch, see interlacing insertion stitch.

Interlaced herringbone band is traditionally used in both Afghanistan and Pakistan to adorn garments.  The Koochi nomadic people in the east and south of Afghanistan and the Baluch people in the south, both use it to adorn garments with decorative bands; over the border into Pakistan, the Baluchi people use to embellish hems and seams.

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Method

In the example below, different colours and different thickness of the thread are used to clearly demonstrate how to execute this decorative band. You could use the same colour for the foundation double herringbone stitch, and the contrasting colour for interlacing. Any type of thread can be used, depending on the effect you want.
Using even-weave fabric makes it easier to work this band neatly. If working on plain-weave fabric, mark two parallel lines as a guide.

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1

Work a double herringbone stitch as a foundation. Work the first row of herringbone stitch, making sure to slip the needle under the previous stitch when going downwards.

2

For the second row of herringbone stitch, when going upwards pass the needle over the previous stitch and under the first row of herringbone stitch.

3

When going downwards, pass the needle under the previous stitch and over the first row of herringbone stitch.

4

After the foundation of herringbone is complete, bring the needle up at the base of the first intersection. Work the interlacing across the top half of the double herringbone stitch from left to right.

5

Going upwards, pass the needle over and under the foundation double herringbone stitch.

6

Encircle the upper crossed part of the foundation herringbone stitch by passing the needle over and under the crossed area.

7

Going downwards, pass the needle over the herringbone stitch and under the working thread, and then under the herringbone stitch.

8

Going upwards, pass the needle over and under the herringbone stitch.

9

Go over and under the upper crossed part.

10

Going downwards, pass the needle over the herringbone stitch and under the working thread, and then under the herringbone stitch.

11

Repeat until the end of the foundation herringbone stitch. At the last intersection, pass the needle under, over and under the herringbone stitch.

12

Continue working the interlacing across the bottom half of the herringbone stitch, this time from from right to left. Going down, go over the herringbone stitch, under the working thread, and then under the herringbone stitch.

13

Encircle the lower crossed part by going over and under the herringbone stitch.

14

Going upwards, pass the needle over the herringbone stitch, under the working thread, then over the working thread and under the herringbone stitch.

15

Going downwards, pass the needle over the herringbone stitch, under the working thread, and then under the herringbone stitch.

16

Continue until you come back to the beginning of the band. Encircle the intersection by passing the needle over and under the herringbone stitch. Take down the needle through the fabric at the starting point to complete the interlacing.

Interlaced herringbone band

Structure of stitch

Embroidery Techniques

References

  • Betty Barnden, The Embroidery Stitch Bible (2003) , p.79
  • Mrs Archibald Christie, Samplers and Stitches (1921) , p.63-4
  • Mary Thomas, Jan Eaton, Mary Thomas’s Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches (Revised Edition) (1989) , p.61
  • Jennifer Campbell, Ann-Marie Bakewell, Guide to Embroidery Stitches (2004) , p.127
  • Muhammad Sher Ali Khan, 'A journey of stitches from tradition to the heritage: Swati embroidery', archive.org. Available at: https://archive.org/details/AJourneyOfStitchesFromTraditionToTheHeritage/page/n1/mode/2up (Accessed: 19 July 2022)