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double herringbone stitch (variation) icon
double herringbone stitch (variation)

  • Indian herringbone stitch
  • Double algerian cross stitch
double herringbone stitch (variation) main image

This version of double herringbone stitch differs very slightly from the original version.  Both consist of two interlocking rows of herringbone stitch, in this version the legs of the herringbone cross in a different pattern which requires the working thread to be taken under previous parts of the stitch, rather than lying on top.  This version is recommended as the basis for interlaced herringbone band, its insertion version (interlacing insertion stitch) and twisted lattice band (the latter two will feature in future RSN Stitch Bank releases).

For more background see the entry for herringbone stitch.

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Method

When taking the thread under another stitch, you may find it helpful to lead with the eye of the needle to avoid the point of the needle catching the fibres of the original stitches.

The spacing of the initial row should be wide enough to allow for the second row.  When stitching as a base for twisted lattice band keep the crosses at the top and bottom quite small to give you more space internally to weave another thread.

This version of double herringbone stitch requires close attention to which thread is uppermost when the threads cross.  When stitching from left to right, where the top crosses are formed the thread should be taken under the previous part of the stitch (this applies to when working both rows of herringbone stitch); when working the second row, the legs worked upwards should be taken under the previous row. 

When stitching from right to left, where the lower crosses are formed the thread should be taken under the previous part of the stitch (this applies to when working both rows of herringbone stitch); when working the second row, the legs worked downwards should be taken under the previous row. 

To verify if your stitch is correct, check that each diagonal thread (for both rows) forms an alternating pattern of crossing threads (either over-under-over or under-over-under) - this applies when working both from left to right and right to left.

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1

Bring your needle up at the left hand end just below the centre line and work the first part of the upper cross in herringbone stitch.  When working the second part of the cross, slide your needle under the previous stitch.

2

Work the lower cross like a standard herringbone (i.e. the working thread is uppermost).  Space your crosses wide enough to leave space for the second row of herringbone.

3

Complete the line of herringbone stitch in this way: for the upper crosses the working thread should lie under the previous leg, and for the lower ones the working thread is on top (as for regular herringbone stitch).

4

Start the second row of herringbone stitch by bringing your needle up at the left hand end, just above the centre,  and work the lower cross.

5

Slide your needle under the leg from the previous row.

6

Work the upper cross as before, i.e. when working the second part of the cross, slide your needle under the previous part, and then take your needle over the previous line of herringbone stitch.

7

Continue working the second row of herringbone stitch in this way, paying close attention to which thread is uppermost.

8

A finished area of double herringbone stitch

9

The reverse of double herringbone stitch.

double herringbone stitch (variation)

Structure of stitch

Common uses

This stitch can be used as a decorative border or as a foundation for more complicated stitches such as interlaced herringbone band, interlacing insertion stitch and twisted lattice band.

Embroidery Techniques

Identifying double herringbone stitch (variation)

This stitch has two rows of herringbone stitch interspersed with each other.  To distinguish this stitch from the standard version of double herringbone stitch, look at which thread is uppermost as they cross: in this version each diagonal thread forms an alternating pattern of crossing threads (either over-under-over or under-over-under).

References

  • Mary Thomas’s Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches (1934) , p.118-9