clear navigate_before

Detached woven picot icon
Detached woven picot

  • Woven Picot
Detached woven picot main image

Woven picots can be worked large or small, thin or wide. Detached picots are attached to the supporting material only at the base and can only be worked with three or five prongs. You could use fine beading wire for the outside prongs of a detached picot to create shapes that you can bend and manipulate.

 

Detached woven picot is generously sponsored by Susan Trafford

Method

The maximum length of a detached woven picot is approximately 1.5cm - any longer than this and they become unstable.

pan_tool
Detached woven picot method stage 1 photograph
1

Place a pin in the fabric to mark the top of the picot. Bring the thread up, wrap it round the pin and take it down.

Detached woven picot method stage 2 photograph
2

Bring the needle back through halfway at the bottom of the picot.

Detached woven picot method stage 3 photograph
3

Wrap the thread around the pin again.

Detached woven picot method stage 4 photograph
4

Do not take the thread through to the back of the fabric. Instead, weave the thread backwards and forwards across the shape’s prongs, as in a normal woven picot.

Detached woven picot method stage 5 photograph
5

Continue weaving the thread.

Detached woven picot method stage 6 photograph
6

When reaching the bottom of the shape with your weaving, take the thread through to the back of the fabric on the side on which you finish weaving.

Detached woven picot method stage 7 photograph
7

Remove the pin and bend the picot upwards, away from the fabric, with the end of the pin.

Detached woven picot method stage 8 photograph
8

Completed detached woven picot

Detached woven picot

Embroidery Techniques

Identifying Detached woven picot

​A detached woven picot can be identified by its triangular shape and its weaved thread in between the prongs, of which there will be either three or five. The detached woven picot’s top point will not be attached to the fabric, whereas a woven picot will have both its top and bottom points attached.

References

  • Mary Thomas, Mary Thomas’s Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches (1934) , p.163
  • Various Authors, The Royal School of Needlework Book of Embroidery (2018) , p.271
  • Mrs Archibald Christie, Samplers and Stitches (1921) , p.122