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Circlets (beadwork) icon
Circlets (beadwork)

Method

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 1 photograph
1

Mark a dot for the position of the centre of the circlet. Start your thread in this spot, then bring the needle up in the same spot. Pick up a large central bead and slide it down to the surface.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 2 photograph
2

Pick up a smaller bead on the same thread to act as a stopper.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 3 photograph
3

Take the needle back through the central bead, then draw the thread through so the stopper sits securely on the central bead.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 4 photograph
4

Bring the needle up a small bead’s width away at the 6 o’clock position (directly below the bead).

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 5 photograph
5

Pick up enough beads to encircle the central bead.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 6 photograph
6

Take the needle back down at the point where you came through. Draw the thread through.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 7 photograph
7

Couch the encircling thread (see ‘Couching with a single needle (beadwork)’ for more information), at the 12 o’clock, 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock positions to finish. For larger circles, you may wish to couch further points.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 8 photograph
8

For smaller circlets, mark a dot for the position of the centre of the circlet. Start your thread just to the side of this spot. Pick up your central bead and take the needle back through the spot.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 9 photograph
9

Bring the needle up at the 6 o’clock position and thread on enough petite beads to encircle the central bead. Take the needle back down at the 6 o’clock position.

Circlets (beadwork) method stage 10 photograph
10

Couch the encircling thread at the 12 o’clock, 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock positions to finish.

Structure of stitch

Common uses

Circlets cane be worked in different sizes, as part of larger designs - flower centres or berries, for example - or as stand-alone shapes. They can enclose any shape - it need not be circular - such as an oval or teardrop shaped jewel, or a pretty shell or stone.

Embroidery Techniques

References

  • Various Authors, The Royal School of Needlework Book of Embroidery (2018) , p.378